Connections Are Business Capital 

LinkedIn has more than 575 million users, according to leading WordPress hosting platform Kinsta, and nearly half of those are active every month (meaning they post, comment or “like” on the platform). If that isn’t impressive enough, LinkedIn has its sights on further investments into Latin America. What makes LinkedIn even more powerful is that users update their bios regularly, which is why LinkedIn remains the leading professional social networking site as those seeking to connect can be confident the connections they are potentially requesting are in the roles listed on posted bios.

LinkedIn is a digital goldmine, especially now in the post-COVID digital paradigm. Users post on career engagement, network with others in the industry and share expertise and advice. Unfortunately, less professional engagement can and does happen on LinkedIn. Understanding what works in the world of LinkedIn for networking, and what hinders, can help remove obstacles for engagement. The following are the five biggest blunders that can hurt credibility and, potentially, career advancement.

Blunder #1: Being vague in why a connection is requested. Some people believe more connections are better. However, some connection requests come with a note that does not share why the sender wants to network. If there is not a clear reasoning for the network connection, many of these requests appear to not help or enhance the receiver’s network. A connection request with a note can help put the connection request into context for the receiver.

Try Instead: Clearly state why a request has been sent and how the connection benefits both parties. To get a connection request accepted, the sender should consider the reason for requesting the connection.

Originally posted at Inbusiness

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